Recipes | Uncategorized

Wine – Home-Made

Wine has been made at home for many centuries, and although a great deal of the art was lost during the Middle Ages there has been a resurgence in wine-making during the last twenty years.

There are many different grape concentrates and fruit concentrates commercially available to the home wine-maker from specialist shops and some retail chemists, which devote a section to wine-making. A great deal of the equipment needed to make wine you will find ready to hand in your kitchen and the remainder can be obtained either at a specialist wine- supplier’s shop or in the larger chemists.

The basic principle of home wine-making remains the same as for commercial – the fermentation of a sugar-rich, flavoured liquid. The sugar is converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide gas, so leaving an alcoholic, flavoured liquid. If you use a concentrate, you will find instructions are given for its use, and provided you follow these strictly, you should have no problems. If, however, you are going to make a fruit, flower or vegetable wine, you will have to extract the flavour from the ingredient to give the wine the necessary bouquet and body before completing the fermentation.

Basic Methods

Different methods are used, as you will see from the recipes overleaf. The grape concentrate recipe is representative of the instructions given with most kits, but for flower wines, it is necessary to extract the delicate natural esters (products of maturation that contribute to the flavour of the wine) and oils which give flower wines their character, so a different method is used. Cereal and vegetable wines tend to be rather heavy and long in their maturation period, so they do not feature prominently in modern wine-makers’ recipes, although all good wine-making books do devote a section to them.

Equipment and Additives

This list represents the basic equipment you will need to begin wine-making:

Polythene Bucket. This should be of 2 to 3 gallon capacity, with a well fitting lid made from non-toxic polythene.

Straining Bag. In either polythene or stainless steel, necessary for straining pulp when transferring from the bucket to the gallon jar.

Spoon. Preferably polythene with as long a handle as possible. Wood can be used, but being porous is not easy to sterilize.

Gallon Jar, Bung and Airlock. The jar should be either glass, non-toxic p.v.c. or polythene, with a bung and airlock to prevent any infection of the wine. Hydrometer and Jar. A very useful piece of equipment for determining when the fermentation has finished, and how much sugar to add to the wine to sweeten or produce a wine of specific alcoholic strength. Instructions are supplied with the hydrometer.

Siphon Tube and U-tube. For transferring wine without taking sediment with the wine.

Wine Bottles, Corks, Polythene Stoppers and Labels. These give the final finish to your wine.

Campden Tablets. These are sterilizing tablets and essential for all wine-makers. To make a sterilizing solution, dissolve

6 tablets in

1 pint of water. This is used as a stock solution, but remember always to keep the bottle tightly stoppered.

It is imperative that ALL the equipment is completely sterilized before use.

Citric Acid. This is used to adjust the acidity of wines.

Wine Yeast. Always use wine yeast not baker’s yeast. A drum of all-purpose wine yeast is economical to buy, and will suit most wines. The amount to use depends on the type and is given on the container. Yeast Nutrient. Necessary to make sure the wine yeast works properly. Pectinaze. An enzyme used to remove pectin haze.

Tannin. Adds flavour to some fruit wines and is available in powdered form. i Bucket, 2 Glass jar, j Dandelions, 4 Funnel, 5 Measuring jar, 6 Filter, 7 Wine concentrate, 8 Wine concentrate, 9

Labels, 10 Lime leaves, 11 Corking machine, 12 Yeast tablets, 13 Yeast nutrient, 14 Elder/lowers, J5 Syphon tube, 16

Hydrometer, IJ Air lock, 18 Pektolase, 19 U-Tube, 20 Campden tablets, 21 Filter papers.

Recipes

In these recipes, you will find the basic processes used in the different methods of wine-making. Grape concentrate is recommended in both the flower and fruit wines, as it gives the resultant wine a much better body and vinosity (true ‘wininess’), as well as aiding faster maturation. If you find grape concentrate difficult to obtain, you can substitute sultanas or seedless raisins at the rate of 1 pound for every 10 fluid ounces of the grape concentrate.

GRAPE CONCENTRATE WINE

1 sachet, can or bottle of grape concentrate recommended to make

1 gallon of wine sugar as recommended on the concentrate water up to

1 gallon wine yeast

1 teaspoon (or tablet) yeast nutrient

1 teaspoon citric acid (if recommended)

2 Campden tablets, crushed

Empty the grape concentrate and sugar into a sterilized gallon jar. Pour in 2 pints of hot, but not boiling water, stir or shake until dissolved. Add 4 pints of cold water and shake again. Add the yeast, yeast nutrient and citric acid, and mix well.

Immediately fit a pierced bung and airlock and leave in a warm place. The ferment should begin in 1 to 6 days; a week later, top the jar up to the neck with cold water. The fermentation should finish in

4 to

6 weeks (hydrometer reading

1.000 approximately, or when bubbles stop coming through the airlock); then siphon the wine off the yeast into a clean jar. Discard the sediment. Top up to the neck with cold boiled water, add the Campden tablets and set aside in a cool place until it is clear. Taste the wine and if sweetening is required, add up to 3 ounces sugar. When the wine is quite clear and still, siphon it into sterilized wine bottles, cork and leave for at least 6 weeks before drinking. The wine will be at its best after 6 to 12 months.

ELDERBERRY WINE

3 lb. fresh elderberries, stripped from their stems water up to

1 gallon

1 Campden tablet, crushed

10 fl. oz. red grape concentrate

2 lb. sugar wine yeast

1 teaspoon (or tablet) yeast nutrient

2 teaspoons pectinaze

½ teaspoon citric acid

Wash the elderberries carefully and dis-card any showing signs of mould. Place the fruit in a bucket and pour over 4 pints of boiling water. Place the lid on the bucket, leave until cool, and add the Campden tablet. Leave for 24 hours, then crush the fruit in the bucket using a sterilized bottle. Add the grape concen-trate and sugar and a further 2 pints of cold water. Stir well to dissolve the sugar, add the yeast, yeast nutrient, pectinaze and citric acid and set aside to ferment in the bucket, in a warm place, for 7 days. Strain the liquid through a sterilized straining bag into a gallon jar, pressing the fruit lightly to extract all the juice.

When the wine is quite clear and still, siphon it into sterilized wine bottles, cork and leave for at least 6 weeks before drinking. The wine will be at its best after 6 to 12 months.

ELDERFLOWER WINE

1 pint elderflowers

10 fl. oz.

½ cups white grape concentrate

2 lb. sugar wine yeast

1 teaspoon (or tablet) yeast nutrient

½ teaspoon citric acid water up to

1 gallon

About 4 to 5 days before you gather the flowers, start the fermentation in the bucket, using the grape concentrate method.

This will ensure that the first fermentation has died down. Pick the flowers, stripping off the leaves and stems. Wash the flowers carefully with cold water to remove any dirt or chemicals. Then place them in the bucket, stir and gently press the flowers with a spoon daily for 4 days. Strain the liquid through a sterilized straining bag, lightly pressing all of the juice out of the flowers, into a gallon jar.

When the wine is quite clear and still siphon it into sterilized wine bottles, cork and leave for at least 6 weeks before drinking. The wine will be at its best after 6 to 12 months.

PEACH WINE

3| lb. ripe peaches, halved, stoned and coarsely chopped

10 fl. oz.

½ cups white grape concentrate water up to

1 gallon

1 Campden tablet, crushed

2 lb. sugar sauterne yeast

1 teaspoon (or tablet) yeast nutrient

2 teaspoons pectinaze

1 teaspoon citric acid

½ teaspoon tannin

Wash the peaches carefully under running water and, using a sharp knife, cut out and discard any bruises. Place the peaches in a bucket and pour over the grape concentrate. Pour over 4 pints of boiling water and stir well. Place the lid on the bucket and leave it to cool. When the liquid is lukewarm add the Campden tablet and stir well to mix. Set aside for 24 hours.

Using either your hands or a flat-bottomed sterilized bottle, crush the fruit in the bucket. Add the sugar and a further

2 pints of cold water. Stir well to dissolve the sugar. Add the yeast, yeast nutrient, pectinaze, citric acid and tannin to the mixture and stir until all the ingredients are thoroughly combined. Replace the lid on the bucket and set the mixture aside to ferment for 7 days in a warm place. Stir and crush the fruit each day during this period.

Pour the liquid through a sterilized straining bag into a gallon jar, pressing the fruit lightly to extract all the juice.

Seal the jar and set aside.

When the wine is quite clear and still, using a syphoning tube, syphon it into sterilized wine bottles, cork and leave for at least 6 weeks before drinking. The wine will be at its best after 6 to 12 months.

REDCURRANT WINE

4 lb. redcurrants, trimmed water up to

1 gallon

1 Campden tablet, crushed

2 lb. sugar

1 pint 2 cups rose grape concentrate chablis yeast

1 teaspoon (or tablet) yeast nutrient

2 teaspoons pectinaze

Wash the redcurrants carefully under running water, and discard any showing signs of mould. Place the fruit in a bucket and pour over 4 pints of boiling water. Place the lid on the bucket and allow the liquid to cool. When the liquid is lukewarm add the Campden tablet and stir well to mix. Set aside for 24 hours.

Using either your hands or a flat-bottomed, sterilized bottle, crush the fruit in the bucket.

Add the sugar and a further 2 pints of cold water. Stir well to dissolve the sugar. Add the grape concentrate, yeast, yeast nutrient and pectinaze to the mixture and stir until all the ingredients are thoroughly combined. Replace the lid and set the mixture aside to ferment for 5 days in a warm place. Stir and crush the fruit once each day during this period.

Pour the liquid through a sterilized straining bag into a gallon jar, pressing the fruit lightly to extract all the juice.

Seal the jar and set aside.

When the wine is quite clear and still, using a syphoning tube, syphon the liquid into sterilized bottles, cork and leave for 6 weeks before drinking. The wine will be at its best after 6 to 12 months.

Similar Posts