Step-ladders

A step-ladder, or pair of steps, as it is otherwise called, is an important item of the household equipment which any amateur joiner of fair skill can easily put together. For the sides are wanted two 4-foot 3-inch lengths of wood measuring 4 inches by $ inch after planing. The top, A, is 18 inches … Read more

SASH CORDS

Sash Cords, Replacing. The replacement of broken or worn sash cords is not so difficult a business as it may appear to anyone who has not tried his hand at it. The beginner is advised, however, to make his first essay on a window with sashes of moderato weight and easily handled. Large sashes with … Read more

PROTECTING PIPES AGAINST FROST

THE time-honoured method of allowing 1 taps to run at night during frost is not always effective, and besides being very wasteful may be disastrous if the outlet of a sink or bath becomes sealed by ice. The safest method of protecting the main is to have a drain-cock fitted near the turn-off cock, turn … Read more

SHARPENING AND ADJUSTING

SHARPENING is done on a very fine- grained stone, first wiped quite clean and given a few drops of thin oil. The strokes should be short, until skill is attained, and care be taken not to alter the angle between cutter and stone, and thereby produce a rounded, instead of a flat, bevel. Adjusting the … Read more

Nails and Nailing

The wire nail is the most popular form of nail for general use. It has good holding-power and is easier to drive than nails with blunt ends. It can be bought in sizes ranging from 1-6 in. in length, and in various gauges or thicknesses. Its large head makes it difficult to punch in below … Read more

LAYING CLEANING LINOLEUM

LINOLEUM is a mixture of oxydized linseed oil, resins, cork-dust and other substances, rolled out on a backing of canvas. It is either monochrome (self-coloured) or patterned. A pattern may be either printed on the surface of a monochrome sheet or go right through to the backing. Through patterned or inlaid linoleum is more expensive … Read more

Ladders

Ladders which will be much exposed to the weather should be kept well painted, especially at the ends of the rungs, which are their most vulnerable points. If a ladder is so long that it cannot be housed under cover, it should be hung on spikes driven into a wall, and protected from the rain … Read more

Soldering

All surfaces which will be soldered should have been well cleaned beforehand and tinned with the very fusible bismuth solder that must be used for the purpose. Dont have the bit very hot, for fear of melting the zinc; and while soldering press the parts together to make a good joint. Solder over all heads … Read more

Ice Cabinet, A cheap home-made

Though we are not often visited by a spell of very hot weather, when one does arrive it is very useful to have some means of preserving perishable provisions and preventing butter becoming almost liquid. The chest illustrated by the two diagrams following can be made cheaply by any handy person, and will be found … Read more

Gutters, House

As a great part of the soot, dust, leaves and other rubbish which falls on a roof is washed by rain into the gutters, these will gradually fill up if not cleaned periodically. Leaves are perhaps the chief offenders, especially as regards low roofs near trees. They decay and form mud. A partly-filled gutter may … Read more

BUILDING A GARAGE

THE conveniences of having a motor car to use are seriously lessened if the car has to be housed in a public garage, or in a hired lock-up garage some distance away. And the oftener the car is needed, the more is the handicap felt. From the financial point of view alone it is worth … Read more

Bed-head Clamp for Electric Lamp

Plane up a piece of wood 12 inches long, 3 inches wide and -J-inch thick. Round off the four corners, and divide it into two parts by sawing it squarely through along a line 5 inches from one end. The longer piece forms the front, which will be turned towards the bed; the shorter, the … Read more

Creepers on the House

It cannot fairly be charged against the self-clinging creepers, ampelopsis and ivy, that they make walls clamp, for the screen of downward-pointing leaves which they present does a great deal in preventing rain reaching the brickwork or masonry to which they cling. There is no doubt, however, as to their capacity for doing damage if … Read more

Clothes Posts, Movable.

At the best, clothes posts are not ornamental, and in most gardens are a disfigurement; but the use of them may be unavoidable. There is therefore much to be said in favour of making them removable when not required. Each post will need a socket, say, 30-in. Deep, in which to be erected, buried firmly … Read more

Protection Against Burglary

The householder can protect himself definitely from losses by burglary and housebreaking only by proper insurance. The expert professional burglar is extremely hard to keep out, whatever precautions be taken. A great many burglaries, however, are committed by comparative amateurs, ready enough to take advantage of tilings being made easy for them, but likely to … Read more

Brickwork in the Garden

Bricks can be used very effectively for garden paths, steps, paving, low walls, pedestals, and other purposes. Those which will be walked or harrowed over should be hard bricks; and, if to be laid flat, must be cut bricks without hollows or frogs in their wide faces. Red bricks are preferable to yellow; and if … Read more

NEW ROOMS FOR OLD

Redecorating and Refurnishing. A Selection of Ideas in modern Furnishing transforms the Old into the Neiv. A typical Example of what can be Done. THE most obvious thing to do with the front door was to make it absolutely plain. But on second thoughts it was decided that as the whole entrance was because of … Read more

IMPROVING AN OLD HOUSE

Deficiencies of old buildings by way of draughts and other discomforts can easily be remedied. OLDER types of houses, whether they be period or as late as Victorian or Edwardian, are usually at their best in the summer. In winter, unless they have been modernized and every detail in them brought up to date, they … Read more

Hot Water in abundance

One small bright coke fire in the kitchen gives as much hot water as is required for all household purposes. It will cook anything. Including bread and pastry, and will in addition heat a number of radiators to warm the rest of the houoe. Another cooker and boiler combination is the new Ideal Cookanheat. It … Read more

Central Heating

In the case of a small house one installation can combine the purposes of central heating, hot-water supply and cooking. In a larger house hot-water supply and cooking should be left to a separate unit, or in the case of a very targe house there should be a separate system for each of the three … Read more

Domestic Boilers

THERE is nothing more uncomfortable than a cold room in winter. There may be a certain amount of warmth round the fireplace, but if the outer fringes of the room are a sort of Arctic circle, visitors and family Buffer agonies of discomfort. To obtain an equable temperature throughout every room should be the aim … Read more

KEEPING THE HOUSE WARM

Evenly-warmed Rooms and Water that is always Hot are Necessities. The newest methods of Heating are described in this article. The litter taken outside the house when cleaning operations are necessary. The boiler – which is built on labour-saving principles – can then very easily be cleaned out.

Open Fires

The Englishmans desire to feel and look at a fire is unsatisfied by radiators, and open fires may be provided in the reception rooms; and when in use the other means of heating may be turned off. At the present time electricity is being increasingly used for cooking. It has the obvious advantage of being … Read more

Cavity v. Solid Walls

ANOTHER question to be considered is the problem of cavity or solid walls. In the former, 4-inch facing bricks are used for the exterior of the house, a 2-inch cavity is left, bound at intervals by pieces of metal to -l-l-inch J?letton bricks on the inside, the whole forming what is generally known as an … Read more

SUPPLYING THE HOUSE WITH HOT WATER

Most households water is heated in a boiler fired with coal, coko, anthracite, or gas, and stored in a hot-water tank. The boiler may be one built into the back of the kitchen range, or a fireplace which also heats a room; or – this alternative is becoming increasingly popular – is an independent boiler … Read more

Mating the Loft Useful

The word loft usually suggests that rather useless portion of a house to which access is possible only by means of rickety steps and unstable ladders. In fact, the whole apartment is definitely associated with insecurity and trouble, for when one gets to the loft there is the possibility of putting ones foot through the … Read more

Concreting Skills Explained

Concrete is made by mixing together aggregates (sand, and gravel or stones) and cement with water. For most DIY jobs you can use all-in aggregates, or ballast. There are different types of cement available but for most DIY jobs ordinary Portland cement will do. This is light grey in colour and is normally supplied in … Read more