How to build a rodent fence
DIY

How to build a rodent fence

If you garden in a rural area where visits by rabbits, squirrels, gophers, and moles are quite frequent, you may save yourself some work and grief by building a fence like this around your lot, your vegetable garden, or around your most valued plants. Here are the materials you would need to build a rodent-proof…

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Curbs and mowing strips

A curbing-mowing strip combination-separating a flower bed from a lawn area can cut down on the time needed for the trimming and edging necessary to keep a garden neat. Even a mowing strip alone has advantages. It contains the lawn in a fixed area, and it helps prevent excessive water run-off because it forms a…

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Garden pools

Most people are attracted to water by its sight and sound. A garden pool can satisfy the desire to be near water, or to see it, or even play in it one way or another. There are types of pools to satisfy almost every taste. A shallow reflecting pool may be all you need. Or,…

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Barbecues and firepits

Most landscape architects will agree that a barbecue doesn’t have to be a garden monument in order to be efficient. Size alone means little. The thing that matters is whether the unit will perform efficiently without straining the owner’s pocketbook and without overpowering other features of the garden or patio. For many people, buying a…

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Concrete block walls

Building a garden or patio wall with concrete blocks is perhaps the easiest approach for the beginner-it also is fast. The size of the blocks alone (8 by 8 by 16) makes a wall go together much more quickly and smoothly than with bricks. There are two basic types of concrete blocks used for build-ing…

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Retaining walls

Stepped concrete forms a series of low terraces; these are less likely to lean or to topple down-hill than is one high wall. Cast concrete posts can be anchored with keyed posts run back into bank or with rods embedded in mass of concrete. Poured concrete walls should have ex-tending foot on the downhill side,…

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Brick walls

Building a brick wall is involved enough that you will benefit by having had some experience handling the material before-hand, even if you have done no more than lay bricks in sand. Still, there is no substitute for working with mortar and brick. No matter how much you read about handling a trowel you will…

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Natural-stone walls

Perhaps the most challenging part of building a stone wall is fitting irregular shapes and sizes into a pleasing and effective pattern. A carefully fitted stone wall has a natural sculptured beauty that few other materials can match. Almost any type of stone that is available in quantity can be used. The easiest stones to…

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Garden and patio walls

The purpose and function of a garden or patio wall varies con-siderably. Some people build a wall for the same reason they build a fence -to provide privacy, to screen off an undesirable view, to act as a boundary line, or to simply define areas within the garden. Others build a wall to delineate a…

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Pebble paving

One of the most favored paving methods is to press stones into a concrete base. This paving holds up well and is easy to reset should any of the stones become dislodged. There is no limit to the size, color, or texture of the stones you can use. Many building supply yards carry a wide…

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Asphalt paving

Asphalt has long been accepted as a paving for driveways, paths, and service areas, but it also is being used more and more for patio and terrace surfacing because of its low cost. Some homeowners use it in combination with other materials such as brick or concrete. Because of its flexibility, a 1-inch asphalt pavement…

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Paving with concrete

Concrete is the most versatile of all garden paving materials. It can have a surface plain and smooth enough for dancing or roller skating, or it can have a rough or patterned texture. These extremes are possible because concrete is a plastic material which will take almost any form and which can be finished in…

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Paving with tile

For paving and garden flooring, tile ranks high in durability, color, and stain-resistance, but like flagstone, it is expensive. However, tile has some unique advantages. It is suitable for large or small areas; it cleans and waxes easily; it is especially good around a barbecue, in a potting shed, on a walkway around a swimming…

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Paving with flagstone

A flagstone pavement not only is durable and solid, but if properly constructed, it can last forever. For many people this lasting quality far outweighs the fact that flagstone is a relatively expensive paving material. There are many different types and colors of flagstone to choose from. The colors are subdued-yellow, brownish red, gray, buff-any…

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Paving with bricks

The basic form, composition, and fabrication of brick have undergone little change over 5,000 years. Heavy clay and soil and water are mixed, molded, or cut into blocks, and then baked in a kiln. Properly fired brick is hard enough to last for centuries and shows only minor wear. There are two basic kinds of…

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Wood edgings for patios, walkways, paths

Wood edgings (often called header boards) not only make neat demarcations between lawns, flower beds, and other planting areas, but they also make handsome edging and division strips for brick, concrete, or other garden paving. Here are some suggestions to consider when installing wood edgings: Use heart redwood or cedar-both are highly resistant to rot….

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How to build raised beds

The raised bed is one feature in the garden that justifies the expense and time required to build it. Well designed, it has a strong architectural value. It also introduces into the garden interesting color and texture in wood, stone, brick, adobe, or other materials. When you plan wisely, a raised bed displays plants impressively,…

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Building a garden bench

With the variety of garden furniture that you can buy ready made, why build a garden bench? The most obvious reason is to gain a piece of garden furniture that is tailor-made. Another good reason is adaptability. At times a garden bench may be-come a garden shelf for the display of plants in containers or…

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Roofing, siding, and flooring for garden structures

Unlike the roof, siding, and flooring for a house, those for a garden structure can usually be quite simple and inexpensive. Most homeowners desire only a reasonably waterproof shelter for garden equipment or a place to relax and entertain during good weather. YOUR CHOICE IN ROOFING A shake or shingle roof is a good choice…

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Basic framing pointers for garden structures

Most garden structures are designed to aid the homeowner in caring for plants and flowers; for storing garden tools and sup-plies; as a shelter against the sun, wind, or rain as an enter-tainment center; or simply as a place to relax. Whatever the purpose, the discussion below presents some basic methods of building garden structures,…

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Building a garden gate

To many people a garden gate may be simply a movable part of a fence, convenient for getting through to the other side. Others may think of a gate as something that should be especially attractive, as the focal point of a garden or an invitation to enter. Ornate or simple, all gates must meet…

Growing Apples Successfully
Apples

Growing Apples Successfully

Type of tree: Bush, standard, half-standard, cordon and espalier. Pollination: At least two apple trees are necessary to produce fruit. Climate preferred: Temperate. Aspect: Any. Early cooking apples can be grown against north-facing walls. Ideal Soil: Well-drained ordinary soil which does not dry out excessively in summer. Yield: 10 cordons will produce 20kg (441b) of…

CULTIVATING ROSES
Roses

CULTIVATING ROSES

THE queen of the garden likes to be treated in a royal manner. In other words, roses are best grown in a separate section of the garden. They do not like to be jostled by other flowering plants. The reason for this is that the rose, being shrubby in nature, likes plenty of air and…

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Climbing Plants

Roses, clematis, jas-mine, wistaria, berbcris, cotoneaster, other climbing shrubs and fruit trees grown on house walls should be provided with trellis or wires to which they may be tied. Driving nails into bricks or joints is very damaging to a Avail, as many an old wall on which gardeners have worked their will for several…

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THE HOME MECHANIC

How the Handy Man and Woman may save Money by Making and Repairing Articles for the Home The so-called designs for which ordinary battens and rustic arch is an unsatisfactory object laths will suffice. Unless skilfully fashioned from carefully- For posts, 2i in. x 2h in. or 3 in. x 2 in. selected pieces. On…

HOW TO GROW VEGETABLES
Vegetable Growing

HOW TO GROW VEGETABLES

Vegetables can be just as interesting to grow as flowers and a well-kept vegetable garden can be as attractive, to the eye of the gardener, as any flower border. This attractiveness can be increased by adopting the old-fashioned practice of laying out the vegetable garden as a pattern formed by geometrically shaped and arranged beds….

Garden Walls and fences
Walls

Garden Walls and fences

These may be to enclose the garden or make divisions within it – or even to prevent landslide – as in the sloping or terraced garden. They can also be built to support climbing plants or to provide decorative interest. Of all the labours of love in a garden building your own wall is perhaps…