Draught Proofing

Draughtproofing Techniques To Reduce Fuel Bills

Ill-fitting doors and windows are the main sources of draughts, but other points of entry are via chimney flues and floors. Warning Beware of total draughtproofing if the room contains a fuel-burning appliance, unless it is a balanced flue type in which case it automatically draws its air from outside. For other appliances, particularly paraffin…

Insulating Ceilings
Insulation

Insulating Ceilings

Ceilings can be insulated (to a degree only) with cork or by applying an anti-condensation paint which not only warms the surface but absorbs what moisture there is — and this absorbed moisture will evaporate when conditions are more favourable. The property of absorption, though supplying an immediate remedy, has the disadvantage that the coating…

Insulating New Floors
New Floors

Insulating New Floors

If the floors of a building, whether concrete, suspended timber or brick on earth, are in really poor condition (dry rot, wet rot, furniture beetle, subsidence) you may decide to replace them. In this case the new floor will inevitably be of concrete and can be insulated when it is being laid. The techniques described…

External Wall Insulation
Insulation

External Wall Insulation

The most expensive way to insulate a solid wall is to apply the insulation to the outside. The expense is caused by the need to provide a strong waterproof facing to the insulation instead of the plasterboard used internally. The advantages and disadvantages of external insulation are many. Assuming you have decided to go for…

Insulating Cavity Walls
Insulation

Insulating Cavity Walls

Before you can insulate your walls you must find out what kind you are dealing with. As a rule, houses are built of brick and most recently built homes have cavity walls, which are made of two thin skins of brick with a gap between. These walls can be recognised by their thickness, usually 270mm,…

Improving Home Insulation
Insulation

Improving Home Insulation

The Building Research Establishment has estimated that up to 50 per cent of the total primary energy consumption of the UK is used to service buildings: for heating, lighting, providing hot water, cooking, and running appliances. Of this energy use about half is required to keep the buildings warm. It seems obvious that the reduction…

Heat loss and insulation
Insulation

Heat loss and insulation

The savings and comfort benefits of good insulation, once installed, are continuous. The cost of insulating all or part of the house is soon offset by the savings in heating bills. Other benefits include reduced likelihood of condensation, improved comfort and even a cooler home in summer. In a typical home, 25 per cent of…

DIY Insulation Tips
Insulation

DIY Insulation Tips

Winter is everyone’s nightmare, with raging draughts and uncontrollable fuel bills taking the leading parts. But there’s a lot you can do to make your home warmer — and reduce your heating bills as well. If your house is cold in winter, or you find your fuel bills are too high, then thermal insulation may…

How To Insulate Walls
Insulation

How To Insulate Walls

INSULATING SOLID WALLS If you can see both headers and stretchers on the outside of your house, your walls will probably be solid and therefore rather more difficult to insulate. Before you try to insulate them you must be sure that they are protected by a damp proof course. If you cannot find one or…

How To Insulate Floors
Insulation

How To Insulate Floors

INSULATING FLOORS Surprisingly enough, the heat loss from a floor area can be quite considerable — cutting it down is a worthwhile job. Heat escapes from nearly every part of a house — roof, walls, windows, doors, even the floor adding substantial amounts to your fuel costs. Insulating the major problem areas can make a…