NUTRITIONAL CURE FOR GLUTEN INTOLERANCE

Many people are either intolerant or allergic to gluten, which is abundant in a number of grains, including wheat, rye, barley and oats. Rice, millet, corn, chestnuts and potatoes contain no gluten.

Gluten in sprouted grains is neutralized by a vitamin and becomes much easier to digest, even by persons who are allergic to it.

Note that infants should be introduced to foods containing gluten as late as possible.

Symptoms of an overdose of gluten include ear, nose and throat infections, infections of the mucous membranes lining the digestive tract, and genital organ infections (in older children and adults).

Some people have trouble tolerating gluten, while others are completely allergic.

The gluten in grains is neutralized by Vitamin E. When grains are milled into flour and cooked (to make bread, pastry, pasta, etc.) much of the Vitamin E is destroyed. Gluten then forms a thick, gluey paste-like substance that adheres to the lining of the stomach, causing intestinal putrefaction and inhibiting the absorption of B vitamins.

If you are allergic to gluten you can develop one or a number of the following symptoms:

– various digestive problems

– deficiencies caused by incomplete assimilation

– recurring inflammation of the nose, throat, ears or genital organs

– psychological problems, notably depression

– joint pain

You can replace gluten-rich bread with bread made from softened whole grain that has not been finely milled (pumper- nickel), allowing its Vitamin E content to remain intact. Bread made from sprouted grain which is then sun-dried and baked at a maximum of 95° Fahrenheit or 35° centigrade (called Essene bread) is another option.

Persons who are completely intolerant to gluten may develop the following symptoms if they are not careful:

– abdominal pain

– intestinal lesions accompanied by chronic diarrhoea

– multiple deficiencies

The only treatment consists of completely eliminating foods containing gluten from your diet, especially those made with wheat, barley, oat or rye flour.

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