Hot Water in abundance

One small bright coke fire in the kitchen gives as much hot water as is required for all household purposes. It will cook anything. Including bread and pastry, and will in addition heat a number of radiators to warm the rest of the houoe.

Another cooker and boiler combination is the new Ideal Cookanheat. It is a com- bination of the independent boiler and gas cooker. The use of the oven and two boiling rings for gas cooking has the additional advantage that no combustion gases come into contact with the food.

It can be obtained in vitreous enamel, finishes: black, grey-mottled, plain green and dark brown.

The Tudor White Rose boiler can be installed in a hall or sitting-room. It is of neat and attractive design and will harmonize perfectly with its surroundings.

The boiler is for central heating b r hot water, and where it is desired that the water for domestic tap service should be provided from the same boiler an indirect cylinder should be used. The White Rose cylinder is available for either hard or soft water.

For hard water the lime deposit is thrown down into the inner cylinder, from which it is easily removed, less frequently and at less expense or inconvenience than from a direct hot-water service boiler.

For soft water, a galvanized or copper indirect cylinder can be used, thus avoiding any risk of discoloured water being drawn at the taps.

Gas. Coke, Coalite, or anthracite are the most suitable fuels.

An alternative to central heating is the slow combustion stove. There are many types available, burning a minimum of fuel, yet efficiently wanning the house. A great point in their favour is that they burn for about twelve hours without attention. They have, as well, the exceptional advantage of keeping alight all night.

The Siesta open fire is an example of this type. It is easy to instal and low in cost. A hot chamber and boiling ring are useful accessories when the stove is fixed in a dining-room or nursery.

The open fire throws out direct heat and the warm circulating chambers induce warm air currents to all parts of the room. It burns coal, coke, anthracite, or any solid fuel.

The Artessc mthracite heating stove and the Cozy stove are other examples of this type of heating. Both require very little attention, and are labour-saving and efficient in the highest degree.

A water-heater which can be regulated by the user to produce any variety of temperature from scalding to cold by merely moving the position of a small lever is a great boon. Berrys electric water-heater can be used in this way.

The outside finish is white or cream cellulose enamel, with coloured bands to match the surrounding decoration. It takes up little space.

The writer has seen an excellent devico in a small flat where no central heating was available. It consisted of a towel rail. Which is heated from an ordinary geyser.

The hot water is discharged into a small receiver, and from this is carried by means of copper piping to the towel rail. The water is then passed through the various coils of the rail and finally discharged into the bath.

The connections are so arranged that when the geyser is shut off the coils remain full of hot water. In this way a hot towel rail is available for drying purposes for about an hour after the geyser is shut off. It can be obtained from £3.

America was the first country to use the fully automatic type of oil burner. An English firm, however, has now produced the Parwinac automatic oil burner, which incorporates all that is best in the American type of equipment, with considerable improvements.

This oil burner is quiet in operation and handsome in appearance. It is entirely automatic, and will maintain the temperature of a residence within a degree of its needs.

Throughout the house an even warmth, adjustable to the temperature of the day, is not only an advantage to ones comfort, but is also a considerable aid in making ones home a healthier place to live in. It removes the danger of passing from a warm room to a cold one. And avoids the necessity of remaining seated close to one centre of warmth.

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