Gephalaria

It is best to grow these plants at the back of the border, or in the wild garden; and they will grow in any ordinary garden soil. They can be increased by seeds or division of the plants at almost any time. Plant in March or April. The yellow flower heads are very attractive, borne on stems 5-8 ft. high.

These thrive in rich sandy loam. Plant in October or March. Seeds should be sown in a cold frame when ripe. Increase also by division in early autumn, and by cuttings of young shoot3 which should be inserted in sandy soil with mild bottom heat. The flowers appear in summer in a variety of colours.

G. barbala is a popular species, the drooping flowers being scarlet. Height 2£-ft.

Ghionodoxa (Glory of the Snow). Hardy bulbs, about 6-in. High, which can be grown on the rockery with good effect. Plant in September, setting the bulbs 3-in. Deep and 1-in. Apart. Lift and replant every third year. Sow seeds in a cold frame in August, placing the seeds a quarter of an inch deep. Also increase by offsets treated as bulbs.

There are varieties with blue, white and rose flowers, and all are suitable for the wild garden or for naturalizing in grass.

Chlorogalum (Soap Plant). Hardy bulbous plants with white and purple flowers most suitable for growing in the border. Plant in autumn or spring, setting the bulbs 4-in. Deep and 3-in. Apart in a light soil in a well-drained south border. Sow seeds in well-drained pots of sandy soil in March. Also increase by offsets treated as old bulbs.

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