Genital herpes

Venereal disease caused by the herpes simplex virus type II. Herpes simplex type I is transmitted by kissing and usually only causes sores and blisters around the mouth, the condition known as cold sores, which can sometimes affect the genitals by oral contact. Herpes simplex II affects the genitals in the first place, and sometimes the lips and mouth by oral contact. Symptoms usually begin 4 to 6 days after infection. One or more painful, moisture-filled blisters form around the penis or vagina; the blisters burst after a few days, followed by itching and smarting. During this active phase the patient may have high fever and muscular pain, and the lymph nodes in and around the genitals may swell. The patient is infectious to sexual partners until two to three weeks after the sores have healed, after which the virus remains inactive in the skin, and no longer presents danger of infection. In some people the condition never recurs, whereas other patients are repeatedly affected by the active phase. There is no drug against the virus; the only therapy is pain killers and speeding up the drying of the blisters. It is important to avoid sexual contact during attacks, and to beware of infecting the eyes via the hands. Regular cervical smear tests are recommended for women patients because there seems to be a relationship between herpes virus infection and cervical cancer. Genu varum (bow leg) Condition in which the ankles touch when the legs are outstretched, but there is still a space between the knees. The result of outward curvature of thigh and shin bones, it is present in about 75 German measles before puberty, because of its effect during a possible later pregnancy. The disease can seriously damage the unborn foetus of a woman coming into contact with the virus for the first time, particularly in the first three months of pregnancy. Skin disorders, deafness, heart abnormalities and disorders of the central nervous system can result in the baby. Usually girls are immunized in their early teens, to prevent such problems.

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