CHILDRENS PROBLEMS: BEDWETTING

Urinating in the bed is only a problem if it occurs beyond a certain age. This age is very variable. About 10 per cent of children will still be wetting the bed at five years of age and intervention and treatment should only be considered if the child is still wetting the bed after the age of seven or eight years. Occasional bedwetting can occur in association with fevers and urinary tract infections in children and adults of all ages. Incontinence associated with old age is discussed elsewhere .

Children should understand the concept and feeling of a full bladder at about the age of two years. Control and requesting to go to the toilet should occur by three years of age and control at night follows on from that.

Most commonly bedwetting is associated with stress. This may be apparent or subconscious and may be associated with the child or the atmosphere in the home or school. Children are extremely intuitive and problems between par- ents, however well disguised from the child, may often be the cause. Infections (bacterial or parasitical, such as worms), diabetes and food intolerance can all be physical causes and need to be ruled out before psychological causes are assumed.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Have a urine sample checked by your local GP.

Provided that there is no obvious physical cause, consider the following homeopathic remedies by referring to your homeopathic manual: Plantago, Equisetum and Kreosotum. A less well-known remedy and therefore difficult to read about is Ilex paraguayensis. Use potency 6, four pills nightly for three weeks and if improvement is not persistent obtain higher potencies until resolution is achieved.

Ensure that the child does not drink too much fluid within 2hr of bedtime.

Ensure that the child urinates before bed and awaken the child to go to the toilet again prior to your going to bed.

A visit to the osteopath, chiropractor or craniosacral therapist can be instantly curative if there is any structural imbalance in the lower spine or pelvis, which in turn puts pressure on the nerves to the bladder.

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