Category Archives: Citrus Fruit Wines

How To Make Wine From Citrus Fruits

It is possible to make wines from citrus fruits of the highest quality and these recipes make for rather better-quality citrus fruit wines than those made from canned citrus fruit or juices.

TANGERINE WINES

How To Make Wine From Citrus Fruits 12-15 tangerines; 450 g (1 lb) sultanas; 225 g (½ lb) bananas weighed after peeling; 3 dl (½ pt) freshly made strong tea; few drops Pektolase; good wine yeast and nutrient; sugar: for dry use 675 g (1 ½ lb); for medium use 950 g (2 lb 2 oz); for sweet use 1.050 kg (2 lb 6 oz); water as in method

METHOD

Peel the tangerines and discard the peel, remove pips and then crush the fruits, being careful not to lose any juice. Put them in the fermenting pail. Chop or mince the sultanas and add these to the tangerines. Put the sugar in about 2 ½ ltr (4 pt) of hot water, bring slowly to the boil, stirring constantly, and while boiling pour over the fruits and give a thorough stirring. Mash the peeled bananas with a fork and put them in about 1.2 1 (2 pt) water in a saucepan larger than you would normally use because they will boil up like milk. Simmer gently with the lid on for twenty minutes, topping up with more water if necessary. Then stir this into the mixture. Add the tea, cover closely, allow to cool to about 18°C (65°F) — lukewarm — and then stir in the yeast and nutrient.

Cover the vessel with sheet polythene, tie this down tightly (or fit the lid) and put the mixture in the warm to ferment for five or six days, stirring daily.

Having done this, strain the mixture through three or four thicknesses of muslin, press the pulp as dry as you can, clean the fermenting vessel and return the strained wine to this. Then bring the mixture up to just under 5 ltr (1 gall) with boiled water that has cooled well. Stir in the Pektolase, cover as before and leave in the warm to ferment for a further ten days. The next step is to pour very carefully into a 5 ltr (1 gall) jar leaving as much deposit in the pail as you can. If the jar is not filled to where the neck begins, fill to this level with boiled water, then fit a fermentation lock and leave until all fermentation has ceased.

ORANGE WINES

Use thin-skinned oranges.

12-14 oranges; 450 g (1 lb) sultanas; 225 g (½ lb) bananas weighed after peeling; 3 dl (½ pt) freshly made strong tea; few drops Pektolase; good wine yeast and nutrient; sugar: for dry use; 675 g (1 ½ lb); for medium use 950 g (2 lb 2 oz); for sweet use 1.050 kg (2 lb 6 oz); water as in method

METHOD

Grate the rind off the oranges and set it aside. Halve the oranges, press out all the juice and fleshy parts, remove pips and put the juice and fleshy parts in the fermenting pail with the chopped sultanas. Put the sugar in about 2 ½ ltr (4 pt) of hot water, bring slowly to the boil stirring constantly and while boiling, pour over the fruits in the fermenting pail and give a good stirring. Add the grated orange peel.

Mash the peeled bananas with a fork and put them in about 1.2 1 (2 pt) of • water in a saucepan larger than you would normally use because they boil up like milk. Simmer gently with the lid on for twenty minutes, topping up with more water if necessary. Stir this into the mixture and then add the tea. Allow to cool to about 18°C (65°F) — luke warm — and then stir in the yeast and nutrient.

Cover the vessel with sheet polythene, tie this down tightly (or fit the lid) and put the mixture in the warm to ferment for six or seven days stirring daily.

Having done this, strain the mixture through three or four thicknesses of muslin, press the pulp as dry as you can, clean the fermenting vessel and return the strained wine to this. Make up the mixture to not more than 5 ltr (1 gall) with boiled water that has cooled well, stir in the Pektolase, cover as before and put the wine in the warm to ferment for a further ten days. The next step is to pour carefully into a 5 ltr (1 gall) jar leaving as much deposit in the pail as you can. If the jar is not filled to where the neck begins, fill to this level with boiled water that has cooled, then fit a fermentation lock and leave until all fermentation has ceased.

GRAPEFRUIT WINES

Best made as dry to medium.

6 large grapefruit; 675 g (1 ½ lb) sultanas; 3 dl (½ pt) strong tea; few drops Pektolase; good wine yeast and nutrient; sugar: for dry use 550 g (1 ¼ lb); for medium use 775 g (1 ¾ lb); and, if you insist upon a sweet wine, use 900 g (2 lb); water as in method

METHOD

Proceed as for tangerine wine, ignoring the instructions regarding bananas.

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