Bouillon

Bouillon (bwee-yon) is a beef and veal bone stock which is enriched with the addition of meat. Like stock, bouillon is used as a base for sauces and gravies, as well as for consomme. You serve the meat and vegetables separately as a main course, but if you do, the finished bouillon will not be strong enough for a consomme.

5 veal bone

1 lb. rolled ribs of beef, with the bones

6 pints plus

6 fl. oz. cold water

2 teaspoons salt

4 carrots, scraped and sliced into

2-inch pieces

1 turnip, peeled and quartered

3 leeks, washed and cut in halves

1 celery stalk, sliced into

2-inch pieces parsnip, peeled and quartered onions, each stuck with 1 clove bouquet garni, consisting of 3 parsley sprigs, 1 thyme spray and 1 bay leaf tied together

Wash the bones and put them in a large stock pot or saucepan and pour over the 6 pints of water. Add the 2 teaspoons of salt.

Place the pot over low heat and bring the liquid slowly to the boil, allowing at least 30 minutes for the liquid to heat.

As the liquid heats, scum will rise to the surface. With a slotted spoon, skim this scum off at regular intervals.

When the liquid reaches boiling point, add 2 fluid ounces of water. Bring the liquid slowly to the boil again, skimming off the scum. When it boils add another 2 fluid ounces of water. Repeat this process once more to clear the bouillon.

Add all the vegetables to the pot. Bring the liquid to the boil and skim off the scum. Put in the bouquet garni. Half cover the pan with the lid on a slant and reduce the heat to low. Simmer the bouillon for 3 hours.

Strain the bouillon through a fine wire sieve into a glass or enamel pan. Discard the meat, bones and vegetables.

Leave the bouillon to cool and then cover the jug or bowl. Do not break the layer of fat that forms on the surface of the bouillon until you are ready to use it.

If you want to serve the boiled beef and vegetables, use a slotted spoon to take them out of the pot after the bouillon has simmered for 1 ½ hours. Then continue simmering the bouillon with just the bones for 12 hours longer.

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